Resourceful Methods to Spend money on some money,500 (Other than in Carries & Buildings)

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Ok so what exactly is a Hit it off? For them to be a Better Deal Than Shares?

When companies need to borrow money, they can borrow it from banks, or they can borrow it from regular people like you and me. That’s where bonds come into play.

Bonds are debt instruments issued by companies, as well as municipalities like cities, states, and counties. The U.S. government also issues bonds – Treasury bonds.

When you buy bonds, you’re essentially agreeing to lend the issuer a certain amount of money for a preset period of time. The issuer, in turn, agrees to pay you a certain amount of interest over the life of your bonds, and then return your principal investment once the bonds mature, or comes due.

Let’s imagine you buy ,000 worth of Company X’s bonds at 4% interest for a 10-year term, and you hold those bonds until maturity. That means you’ll collect two 0 interest payments each year for a total of 0, and then, you’ll get your original ,000 back after a decade.

But collecting interest isn’t the only way you can make money from bonds. Bond values can fluctuate based on how the market or a given issuer is doing, so you might have the option to sell your bonds above face value, or for a price that’s higher than what you paid for them, and profit as a result.

Now some people like to lump bonds and stocks into the same general “investing” category, but the two are very different from one another. When you buy bonds, you’re lending the issuer money, and it’s obligated to pay you interest and return your principal later on.

When you buy stocks, you’re actually getting an ownership stake in the issuing company. If that company then does well, it might share its wealth in the form of dividends. You might also get voting rights that give you a say as to how that company operates. With bonds, you get paid regardless of whether the issuer is profitable – but you don’t get a say in how it manages its money. And remember, some bonds are issued by the government itself – and the government certainly doesn’t want your opinion on how it should run.

There are plenty of good reasons to add bonds to your portfolio. First, though there’s no such thing as a risk-free investment, they’re a relatively safe one compared to stocks because their values don’t tend to fluctuate quite as rapidly. And the better a job you do of vetting bond issuers, which you can do by looking up their credit ratings, the less likely you are to lose money on a bond investment.
Bonds are also a good way to secure a steady stream of income in the form of the semiannual interest payments we talked about earlier. Stock dividends, by contrast, aren’t guaranteed, because corporations aren’t contractually obligated to pay them the same way bond issuers are required to pay interest.

Furthermore, usually, when you collect dividends or interest, you’re required to pay taxes on that money. Some bonds, however, allow you to earn interest without owing the IRS taxes. Municipal bonds, for example, are always exempt from interest at the federal level. And if you buy municipal bonds issued by your home state, you’ll avoid state and local taxes as well. Treasury bonds, meanwhile, are always exempt from state and local taxes.

On the other hand, bonds do have their drawbacks. First, they require you to lock your money away for a potentially lengthy period of time, so if you’re the type who fears commitment, you might have some issues with that. From a financial perspective, tying up your money for what could be 10 years or more exposes you to something called interest rate risk.

We just learned that bonds pay a certain amount of interest, depending on what their contracts call for. But what happens if you buy 10-year bonds paying 4% interest, and a month later, that same issuer offers bonds at 4.5% interest? Suddenly, your bonds lose value, and you lose out on the added income that higher interest rate would’ve given you.

Furthermore, while bonds are considered safer than stocks, they’ve historically delivered lower returns. If you load up too heavily on bonds, you might limit your portfolio’s growth over time.

Ultimately, if you’re going to buy bonds, you might consider an approach called laddering. All that means is buying bonds that mature at different intervals rather than sinking a bunch of cash into bonds with a single maturity date. That way, you get access to your money along the way, leaving you free to reinvest it in other places or snag higher bond interest rates as they become available.
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Benefits and drawbacks of Shares over a Space: Is one better than the other?

So which is the „better“ investment…stocks or real estate? In this video, I do my best to break down the pros and cons of each option and weigh the results against the potential return one could possibly expect to achieve. Since picking individual stocks can vary so widely in price, as would flipping a house, I’m comparing long term rental real estate to an total stock market index fund.

It’s a hard question to answer, and a lot comes down to personal preference, but these are some things to take into consideration before we break down the numbers. Just for clarification – picking individual stocks, day trading, or swing trading is NOT included – you could achieve much higher returns and many people do this. However, since you could also invest and flip real estate, I felt this would be an unfair comparison with too many variables – which is why index funds vs rental properties were used.

Each have their upsides and downsides…

Pros for index fund investing:
-It’s completely passive. Once you spend a few minutes going to a website and buying a stock, you’re done.
-You don’t need tens of thousands, or hundreds of thousands of dollars like you generally need with rental real estate.
-There are no hassles of working with tenants, fixing items, or maintenance.
-You can buy index funds within a tax advantaged account such as an IRA or 401k.
-Stocks are fairly liquid and you can cash out quickly when you want to sell.

Pros for real estate investing:
-You have total control over what you buy and at what price
-You can take advantage of undervalued properties and areas
-You can add square footage, remodel, and gain quick equity and increase cash flow
-You can leverage your money and achieve potentially higher returns
-You can receive consistent rental income

In terms of the raw returns, generally real estate CAN yield a higher return, usually if you leverage your money – HOWEVER, the higher return is balanced by the amount of work, skill, and knowledge needed to find the right deal and close on the right price. Real estate is also not an entirely passive investment, so even though you can make significantly more, it also comes with more work. If you’re looking for something entirely passive, stocks will likely yield a little less but it comes with the ease of not having any responsibilities or obligations. So much of it comes down to personal preference. My recommendation is to do both 🙂

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Suggested reading:
The Millionaire Real Estate Agent: http://goo.gl/TPTSVC
Your money or your life: https://goo.gl/fmlaJR
The Millionaire Real Estate Investor: https://goo.gl/sV9xtl
How to Win Friends and Influence People: https://goo.gl/1f3Meq
Think and grow rich: https://goo.gl/SSKlyu
Awaken the giant within: https://goo.gl/niIAEI
The Book on Rental Property Investing: https://goo.gl/qtJqFq
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Wealthy investors can diversify beyond stocks and bonds by owning cornfields. John Taylor of U.S. Trust says farmland produces capital gains as well as income.

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